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Research

Benefits and Compensation 

Evaluating Worksite Wellness: Practical Applications for Employers 
Sponsored by WellPoint  

Fostering a healthier workforce can build significant competitive advantage. However it is often challenging to develop, execute and sustain an effective worksite wellness program. Demands to justify the costs of wellness programs continue to grow, and collecting and analyzing the data is often a complex and time-consuming task. This publication can help. 

Evaluating Worksite Wellness provides techniques, tools and strategies for evaluating a wellness program effectively. It covers the issues essential to any evaluation in a straightforward, step-by-step fashion that is thorough, yet easy to follow. Using these tools to develop and evaluate your wellness program will help you to offer more targeted, cost-effective interventions that yield results. Not only will you save your company money, you will also help improve the health and well-being of your employees.
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Business Leadership and Strategy

New! The Changing CHRO Role
From the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

CEO succession has increasingly gained board attention over the past 10 years. While always a responsibility, the intersection of a number of companies facing CEO succession crises and the increased scrutiny placed on the board due to regulations such as Sarbanes-Oxley have moved CEO succession to the forefront of the board’s agenda. In addition, research by PwC reveals that global CEO turnover was 19% last year and recent research shows that up to 35% of CEO departures are forced. Given these developments, not surprisingly recent HR@Moore surveys reveal that succession planning has emerged as one of the CEO’s top priorities for the CHRO. .

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New! Business Talent Challenges: Exploring Meaningful Solutions
From the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

The 2016 HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers explored the CEO’s leadership style, particularly in terms of narcissism and humility, and some aspects of C-suite dynamics. The results showed that while some CEOs can be described as narcissists, the vast majority fail to fit this negative stereotype, and in fact, most would be described as relatively humble. CEOs have relatively positive perceptions of the board, but have some concerns with the extent to which the board may get involved in more operational decisions, thus, overstepping their boundaries. Executive leadership teams were described in terms of Agreement, Camaraderie, and Trust. They scored highest in trust, followed by camaraderie, and finally agreement. .

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New! CEO Narcissim, CEO Humility, and C-Suite Dynamics  
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

The 2016 HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers explored the CEO’s leadership style, particularly in terms of narcissism and humility, and some aspects of C-suite dynamics. The results showed that while some CEOs can be described as narcissists, the vast majority fail to fit this negative stereotype, and in fact, most would be described as relatively humble. CEOs have relatively positive perceptions of the board, but have some concerns with the extent to which the board may get involved in more operational decisions, thus, overstepping their boundaries. Executive leadership teams were described in terms of Agreement, Camaraderie, and Trust. They scored highest in trust, followed by camaraderie, and finally agreement. .

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Employment Downsizing and Its Alternatives: Strategies for Long-Term Success  
Sponsored by Right Management

Employment downsizing has become a fact of working life as companies struggle to cut costs and adapt to changing market demands. However business leaders must always be mindful of the short- and long-term costs of layoffs. Before making a decision to downsize, managers should consider the variety of effective alternatives available. This new report, based on the latest research, helps business leaders evaluate their options and treat employees humanely and with dignity when downsizing is necessary.

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Data Analysis

HR and Big Data

In today’s information age, data and analytics can be used to measure just about anything. And while few HR departments are without business analytics, many still struggle to use what data they do have in a way that matters. To better serve their customers, HR must analyze the information they already have access to, and interpret it to continue to grow their organizations strategically. See how organizations are using data, both “big” and “small,” and learn why some aren’t yet taking advantage of the information they have, and discover the outgrowths of each strategy.  

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Diversity

The Aging Workforce: Leveraging the Talents of Mature Employees
Underwritten by a grant from the Sloan Foundation   

In most industrialized countries the large Baby Boom generation will be reaching traditional retirement age and leaving the workforce over the next 10-20 years.  To respond to this exodus of talent, organizations must recognize the value of mature workers and develop strategies to retain and engage them. Mature workers—generally defined as workers over age 50 or 55-- have experience and skills honed during decades of employment. Retaining talented mature workers—and recruiting new ones—is simply good business for most organizations. This report helps you to understand and prepare for these demographic changes so your organization can leverage the mature workforce as a valuable competitive advantage.

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Human Capital Trends

2017 Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends

Organizations face a radically shifting context for the workforce, the workplace, and the world of work. Deloitte’s survey of more than 10,000 business and HR leaders from 140 countries reveals 10 areas for businesses to focus on to better organize, manage, develop, and align people at work.

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Succession Planning

New! CEO Succession Success: A Board Perspective 
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

To examine how boards define “success” in CEO succession, we interviewed 22 members of Fortune 200 boards (as well as some smaller boards), who sat on over 100 combined boards, about their experiences with CEO succession as board members. Of the CEO successions of which they had been a part, we found that unplanned successions were more likely to fail than planned ones, but surprisingly, that internal successions were at least as likely as external ones to fail. We found that they
tend to take longer to conclude a CEO is a failure than a success, and that they use more qualitative metrics than might be expected in their evaluation. In terms of process, we found that practices for success in managing CEO succession include: starting the process early, correctly defining the role’s specifications, and gathering as much information as possible about CEO successor candidates. Finally, some board members discussed the causes of CEO failure, and many described failed CEOs as those who displayed excessive egos, failed to listen to others, and eschewed feedback. In short, failure was often associated with personality problems rather than competence issues. 

 

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New! The Chief HR Officer's Role in CEO Succession Planning 
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

Interviews with 22 members of public and private company boards revealed their beliefs about and expectations for CHROs in the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) succession process. Board members distinguished between credible CHROs who can add significant value to the process and those CHROs who they do not want to see included in almost any aspect of the process. When credible, board members want CHROs to have confidential conversations with the current CEO, to create processes and development plans for potential successors, and to provide their own independent insights regarding candidate strengths and weaknesses. Directors noted that CHROs who add value must display expertise, honesty, transparency, courage, and the ability to build trusting relationships. 

 

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New! Current Practices in CEO Succession
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

The 2016 HR@Moore Survey focused on CEO succession practices firms currently implement to maximize the likelihood of  success in the choice of the next CEO. The report asks questions regarding non-public data. Here, we aggregate the results to describe current practices of CEO succession across organizations. The results suggest that both CEOs and boards are heavily involved in CEO succession. They also show a large number of firms are not prepared for an unexpected CEO departure, having no successor candidates fully prepared for such an event, and would instead be forced to settle for “ready enough” candidates. And while the diversity of CEO successor candidates has improved over the past five years, CHROs still report the diversity of the candidate pool is less than desired.

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Building the C-Suite Talent Pipeline 
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

The HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers probed 143 CHROs regarding their strategies for building the C-suite talent pipeline. CHROs reported that they place the greatest importance on practices aimed at developing this talent, followed by those focused on retaining this talent. Specifically, firms provide individuals in the C-suite talent pipeline with significant access to the senior leadership of the firm, so that these individuals can begin to understand C-suite roles and so firm leaders can assess individuals in the talent pipeline. CHROs also emphasize using stretch assignments/job rotation and special projects as means of both developing broader skills/perspectives and assessing those individuals in the pipeline regarding their potential to handle jobs of increasing scale and complexity. In addition, firms use formal assessments to identify skill gaps and behavioral styles that need to change in order to succeed in C-suite roles. The use of formal assessments for identifying those that should be entered into the talent pipeline and the development of internal executive development programs emerge as opportunity areas that firms can leverage to more effectively build the pipeline of C-suite talent.

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CEO Assessment and Onboarding 
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business 

This report describes the results of a survey of over 200 Chief HR Officers (CHROs) regarding the assessment practices their companies use to gather information on potential CEO successors. The survey also asked them to describe practices used to socialize/orient a new CEO into his or her role.

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CHRO Succession 
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business 

This report discusses the results of the 2014 HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers, particularly focusing
on the section that explored Chief HR Officer (CHRO) succession. The results show that a vast majority
(60%) of the CHROs were hired either from outside the organization or outside the HR function, with only
32% attaining the role through a normal internal succession process. Most outside hires suggested that the
reason for the outside hire was due to a lack of sufficient internal talent. In addition, CHROs reported that
they were least prepared for dealing with the board around issues of executive compensation, and that the
prior assignment that was most valuable for preparing them for the CHRO role was serving as a business
partner to a large business.

CHROs who describe current efforts to develop an internal successor report that it requires getting the
potential successor visibility with the CEO, ELT, and the board, and this usually occurs through special
projects. It also requires developing their skills/experiences/perspectives through rotating the individual
through difficult roles.

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The Critical Role of CHROs in CEO Succession
Produced by the University of South Carolina Darla Moore School of Business

The 2013 HR@Moore Survey of Chief HR Officers (formerly the Cornell/CAHRS Survey of Chief HR Officers) focused on the Chief HR Officer’s (CHRO) role in the CEO succession process. The survey revealed three key internal actors to the succession process: The incumbent CEO, the potential successor candidates, and the Board of Directors (BOD).

Quantitative results revealed that over 80% of BODs design exposure for successor candidates, have a defined ownership of the succession process, conduct ongoing assessment of candidates, and schedule conversations with the CEO. However, 60% or fewer companies have developed a role profile for the future CEO based on a 5+ year strategy, provide a feedback process for candidates, have tools for talent assessment, include succession discussions in board minutes, develop role profiles for potential successors, or explore the external market for successors.

 

 

 

 
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